Project

Supporting 5,000+ At-Risk Children Project

Since 2016, EAC and United World Schools (UWS) have been working together to increase access to quality primary education to some of the most disadvantaged out of school children (OOSC) in Cambodia, Myanmar and Nepal. By confronting poverty, lacking infrastructure and socio-cultural discrimination, EAC and UWS are collaborating again to help prevent 5,198 at-risk children from dropping out of primary education.

Supporting 5,000+ At-Risk Children Project

United World Schools (UWS) is an independent organisation providing education opportunities to children who have been denied access. UWS has a sense of social purpose combined with a balanced sustainable model that focusses on educating children in post-conflict developing countries whilst stimulating global cultural exchange and understanding. As its mission, the organisation works with communities to build schools and develop the skills of local teachers, providing a low-cost and sustainable path “to teach the unreached”. Through active partnerships between community schools in economically disadvantaged regions of the world and more affluent schools and organisations, UWS’ intervention model has proven effective.

Based on previous experiences in Cambodia, Myanmar and Nepal, UWS has identified barriers to retention that make it difficult for students to remain in education. The primary objective of the current joint EAC/UWS Supporting 5,000+ At-Risk Children Project is to increase the retention of children considered to be at ‘high-risk’ and ‘most at risk’ of dropping out of primary education in the aforementioned countries.

Furthermore, the Supporting 5,000+ At-Risk Children Project will build local capacity to attempt to lessen the incidence of dropout, as well as design, test and measure the impact of its retention activities. Overall, the project strategies centre on: 1) identifying at-risk students; 2) building systems and capacity; 3) engaging families; 4) providing targeted support; and 5) community sensitisation. Specific activities include home visits, selecting and training School Retention Teams, leading community dialogues to promote the importance of education, the provision of school supplies, uniforms and sanitary kits, and targeted tuition classes focussed on remedial education to help children catch up on their lessons.

For more information about this EAC Implementing Partner, please visit the United World Schools website.

 

Partners

United World Schools

Through community consultation and ownership, EAC and United World Schools (UWS) are teaming up to build schools and enrol 33,830 out of school children (OOSC) across Cambodia, Myanmar and Nepal.

Countries

Cambodia

Cambodia

The Kingdom of Cambodia has, over the last decade, enjoyed robust economic growth – GDP is estimated to have grown at approximately 8 percent between 2000 and 2010, and at least at 7 percent since 2011. As such, the government envisions Cambodia entering the realms of lower-middle income country status by 2030 and achieving developed country status by 2050.
Myanmar

Myanmar

Myanmar, the largest mainland country in Southeast Asia, is home to more than approximately 130 ethnic groups with distinct cultures and languages. The country has known periodic spells of armed conflict and inter-communal violence, particularly in border areas, which trigger flows of refugees and internal displacement. In addition, poverty is a formidable development challenge in Myanmar. According to the 2009-2010 Integrated Household Living Conditions Survey in Myanmar, 26 percent of the population lived below the national poverty line and poverty incidence was concentrated in Ayeyarwaddy, Chin, Rakhine, Shan and Tanintharyi.
Nepal

Nepal

Located between China to the North and India to the South, Nepal is a landlocked country composed of a vastly diverse population with distinct cultural, ethnic and religious backgrounds. A 2011 national census revealed that the country was home to at least 125 ethnic groups. According to the Nepal Living Standards Survey conducted the year prior, approximately one-fourth of the population lives below the poverty line. Furthermore, the 2013 United Nations Human Development Index classified Nepal 157 amongst 187 countries. In April 2015, a massive earthquake killed scores of people and devastated the country’s infrastructure.